Yes, the calendar says that it is officially the fall season. But let's be honest.

We think it is safe to say that most of us that live in the 701 would like to enjoy just a few more fun times in the sun.

Don't get us wrong. There are lots that we enjoy about the wintertime and the snow, but at the way many weather forecasters are saying, we could be in for a doozy this year. And quite frankly, we are just not ready for that yet!

Here is now how you know that you are not ready for fall to come in yet.

You are wearing shorts even though it may be cold!!!
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That tan is fading, but some of us just refuse to let go and tackle the warmer clothes.  Hence, let's just wear shorts one more day.


You are still going to the lake. 
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When it comes to our water sports and fun water-related activities, North Dakotans love the water.  It could be to fish or just be in the presence of it.  We will hold on to the river and lake enjoyment until it freezes over, literally.


You refuse to buy pumpkin spice anything.
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Now some people really like this iconic fall time favorite.  But it has been our experience that many just want to hold off on the pumpkin spice and hang on to the summer drinks, cocktails, and refreshments.  We are in the latter group.


Orange is not your color. 
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No matter how hard you may try, orange is just not a color that suits you.


 

SOUP
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No matter the flavor, the temp outside, the cloudy, rainy weather...

"NO SOUP FOR YOU!"


8 Annoying Things North Dakotans Do At The Grocery Store

Here's what we need to stop doing.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

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