It's really amazing how people go out of their way to help others in need

"North Dakota Nice" comes into play big time when situations occur and so many wonderful stories we hear about people lending a hand. There are many ways of course to help, donating money, volunteering your time, and if you are like one local man, you can basically be "On-call"  almost 24/7. So what does he have to contribute? Have you ever heard that old saying "You're NOT going out in a Blizzard are you?" Jacob does.

This is THE most unselfish thing you'll ever hear about

25-year-old Jacob Dockter is from Romania, he was adopted 22 years ago and lived in Washburn, North Dakota. There was a time in his life when drugs almost took him out, so much so that he overdosed on heroin and fentanyl on one occasion, he credits his life being saved to the Bismarck Fire Department and Bismarck Police. In his days of trouble, Jacob never once lost sight of his respect for those that were trying to help him through the demons of addiction. He is now 5 years clean, and when the weather turned nasty on Monday, he knew the perfect way to GIVE BACK.

One of many Bismarck Blizzard heroes

I talked to this modest guy this afternoon, and his mission was made clear, he was offering up his time to aid those stuck in the snow, to give rides to people who were stranded. Taking essential workers to their job is so vital. All of what he has done so far was out of GIVING BACK, to show his appreciation through his unselfish deeds. So far he has helped 20 stranded motorists and has given at least 20-30 rides, all through this powerful storm. Here is another amazing thing, people from not only here in Bismarck, and elsewhere are calling him to offer money to help Jacob pay for gas - these are fellow North Dakotans offering their ways of GIVING BACK. He is in the process of starting a junk removal business, and he will be great at it - he knows how to take care of others.


LOOK: Food history from the year you were born

From product innovations to major recalls, Stacker researched what happened in food history every year since 1921, according to news and government sources.