Across the country, and even here locally, food pantries struggle to keep one thing in stock... and it's one of the most requested items.

MILK

According to MilkLife.com. US food banks receive the equivalent to one gallon of milk, per person, per year.

So, what's the problem?

It really comes down to storage. Refrigerating mass amounts of milk is very difficult to do, especially for small-town food pantries. And if that's not enough of a challenge, on average, milk only lasts about 20 days, before going bad.

That's not all...

MilkLife also says other items are in short supply. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and lean meats hardly get dropped off. Most people donate goods that have a long shelf-life, which makes sense.

North Dakota and Minnesota receive a large donation

Yesterday, (March 23rd) Cass-Clay Creamery delivered 24,000 "Giving Cow" milks to the Great Plains Food Bank, and plan to drop off another 24,500 later this year. These will be distributed to food pantries, shelters, and soup kitchens throughout Clay County, Minnesota, and North Dakota.

 

Cass Clay, Great Plains Food Bank
Cass Clay, Great Plains Food Bank
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The future of milk?

You might be wondering, "What's Giving Cow milk?" That's fair, I just found out myself! These are 8-ounce packs of ultra-high temperature, pasteurized milk. They are single serve, and are said to have a shelf-life of up to 12 months. They don't even require refrigeration. We are definitely living in the future!

Where you can donate locally:

There are several food banks in the BisMan area. Here a few places you can bring donations:

  1. Bismarck Emergency Food Pantry, 1012 S 12th St, Bismarck
  2. Great Plains Food Bank, 1315 S 20th St, Bismarck
  3. Ministry on the Margins, 201 N 24th St, Bismarck
  4. Heavens Helpers Food Café, 220 N 23rd St, Bismarck
  5. Aid Inc. Self Help Center, 314 W Main St, Mandan

 


 

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