The North Dakota Department of Public Instruction (NDDPI) has scheduled a public hearing at the State Capitol on Thursday, Sept. 8th at 9:30am to address proposed changes to the ND Admin Codes 67-16 and 67-19 and the creation of 67-32 according to The Bismarck Tribune.

AmericanExperiment.org indicates the changes would require North Dakota school boards to allow for academic transparency on the subject of "Critical Race Theory" in K-12 schools. This, to make sure it's not being taught.

What Is Critical Race Theory?

If you don't know, Critical Race Theory (CRT) is the belief and/or idea that racism goes beyond individual prejudice; it is systemic and present in laws that govern our country, public education, housing, and even healthcare. Behind CRT is the idea that there are groups of people who are marginalized in our society and unable to equally prosper. This is believed to be due to racial discrimination.

ND State Law Does Not Allow The Teaching Of Critical Race Theory

Century code 15.1-21-05.1 prohibits the teaching of "Critical Race Theory" in its required K-12 curriculum. Gov. Burgum signed this into effect in 2021.

The official definition of CRT in 15.1-21 is as follows:

"Critical race theory means the theory that racism is not merely the product of individual bias or prejudice, but that racism is systemically embedded in American society and the American legal system to facilitate racial inequality."

According to AmericanExperiment.org, the proposal of NDAC 67-32 would require North Dakota school boards/schools to adopt a policy on CRT and allow the public access to instructional materials, curriculum and other resources. This, to ensure schools remain compliant with the aforementioned law, prohibiting CRT in the core curriculum.

**To be sure this information is fully accurate, I've requested access to the proposed changes; my request is pending.**

Public Comments

The source says the meeting will take place in the Peace Garden Room. The public is allowed to make written and oral comments. Those can be directed Jim Upgren at jimuprgen@nd.gov, or to 701-328-2244. The public comment period will close Monday, Sept. 19th.


 

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