Have you seen the TV ads for a new alcohol home delivery app called "Drizly"?

It works just like the food delivery apps that I've been using probably more than I should. Some nights there's just nothing in the fridge and I'm too darn lazy to go to the grocery store so I tap the app and wait for someone to bring me food.

But what if there's no beer in the fridge? What if it's because you drank them all? Well, there's certainly no jumping in your car.  Buzz driving being drunk driving and all...so just download Drizly, tap the app, and the beer "tap" just comes to you!

Not so fast liquor lips.

Drizly doesn't do North Dakota.  I'm not certain if it's against state or city ordinances, but it does seem like quite a tricky thing to set up.  This from the North Dakota Century Code... 

A licensed alcohol carrier may ship alcoholic beverages into, out of, or within this state. A licensed alcohol carrier shall pay an annual fee of one hundred dollars and obtain a license on an application form provided by the tax commissioner and subject to any requirements determined by the tax commissioner. a. A licensed alcohol carrier shall ensure all containers of alcoholic beverages shipped directly to an individual in this state are labeled with conspicuous words "SIGNATURE OF PERSON AGE 21 OR OLDER REQUIRED FOR DELIVERY". A licensed alcohol carrier may not deliver alcoholic beverages to a person under twenty-one years of age, or to a person who is or appears to be in an intoxicated state or condition. A licensed alcohol carrier shall obtain valid proof of identity and age before delivery and shall obtain the signature of an adult as a condition of delivery.

So that is regarding a "licensed alcohol carrier". That, I assume would be the individual delivering directly to your doorstep. In the past, I have been a member of a beer-of-the-month club, which was a pain, because someone over 21 always had to be present to sign for it.  There's no just leaving alcohol outside your door.

Drizly operates differently from the food delivery services.  They just provide the app service and the liquor stores provide their own drivers.  Drizly is not allowed to make any money regarding the liquor transactions, so they make their money providing equipment and use of the app.  In searching around for this story, I came across a website banner for Miller Lite promising delivery within an hour. That service was also not available around here.

I made a couple of calls around Bismarck/Mandan to see if any local businesses were making any booze deliveries alongside the grocery deliveries.  They are not.  But it seems to me that they probably could be if they adhered to some rules and jumped through some hoops.  Probably not enough sales volume to make it worthwhile.  I guess we'll see how Boston based Drizly grows.  They have made their way into Edmonton and Calgary so there's a possibility Drizly or someone like them, could make their way to our prairie outpost.


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